Thursday, November 29, 2007

Guerilla again

Tuesday was another Guerilla milonga, where we set up shop at a T stop and danced. This time we had a little bit more of a plan, with a good sized sign that announced that we were not selling anything and that people should feel free to stop and watch, and if they had any questions they could ask any of the dancers. There were also flyers with information about Argentine Tango and the local instructors. And we drew a few crowds throughout the evening! It seemed with the big sign saying not to fear, we were not selling anything, people were more inclined to stop and watch. My favorite audience member about 8, he was waiting for the train with his dad. And he was riveted to the dancing. When the train came, he dad tugged at his sleeve, and the little boy looked aggravated, and plopped his small self down on the platform to watch. His dad just laughed, and indulged his son. They sat through 4 or 5 trains until the dad finally pulled him away. Hmmmm... a future tanguero in the making?? You never know how this sort of thing will affect someone.

There were 6 if us who came out, and it was a blast. I just relaxed and enjoyed myself, I did not worry about the crowds, in fact, I usually did not notice them at all. There were a few points when people would start clapping for the 6 of us and it startled me. Kinda cool. :-) But because I was relaxed and felt no pressure, I felt as though I was moving well. I felt grounded, I felt connected, but most importantly, I felt joy. And that made all the difference.

;-)

4 comments:

tangobaby said...

During the summer we had outdoor milongas in Golden Gate Park here in San Francisco. The skateboarders would circumnavigate our space, the older folks would sit on benches and eat their sandwiches and watch. But the best part were when the little kids (maybe 3, 4 or 5 years old) would spontaneously run over to us and pair up and dance.

They had no fear. They heard music, saw others dancing, and jumped right in. We had to watch our big selves around the tiny couples (no big boleos) but the innate love of dance these kids had was enormously joyful to have around us, even when they were a tad underfoot.

I'm glad that this dad endulged his son instead of hustling him off home to a night of television. Perhaps you've awakened a future tanguero!

David said...

What fun.

La Tanguera said...

I just love dancing in the outside, particularly in places where those who are passing by can be surprised, stay to take a look, and ask: "what are you dancing?" or " Is this some kind of competition?" ... and they seem to be in awe for moves that for us as addict Tangueros/as are just second nature. It makes me feel that this is a way to share what we have with the outside world, and that maybe someone will be curious enough to try it for her/himself...

Alex said...

Hola Debbi!

Guerrilla Tango is one of the best ways to share/grow the Argentine Tango communities. There was one in Austin at the University of Texas at Halloween - at least a dozen people stopped to chat, ask questions, and pick up a business card or flyer. All of the Austin area teachers were represented there.

It's just too bad we Americans are so suspicious and jaded. Maybe there should be a sign like the "Free Hugs" guy..."Free Tango"...

TB....that's cool about the little kiddos...the same thing has happened at house milongas in Aspen when the little ones are still awake...they just jump right out there and start dancing...